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The Wish for a Womb: How Uterus Transplants Can Make Pregnancy Possible

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After success in Swedish trials, the first uterine transplant was performed at Cleveland Clinic in the United States this past February. The research in Sweden had shown that these transplanted uteruses could carry babies and produce live births. The often troublesome side effects of having a uterus — namely painful or heavy periods, among other(...)

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Pursuing Social Justice Through Social Innovation

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Social justice and social innovation have recently become buzzwords in millennial circles as focal points for tackling social issues. In essence, social justice purports a world in which all people have a right to equitable treatment and fair allocation of resources without any form of discrimination. Social innovation is a new movement grounded in the(...)

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Was ‘Meaningful Use’ Meaningless?

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When I started medical school in 2009, one of my responsibilities was to write progress notes and help write out the details of patients’ conditions on their paper charts. Years later when I started residency, I walked into patients’ rooms bare-handed, carrying nothing but my stethoscope and eyeing the computer in the corner that I(...)

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Social Strategies for Innovations in Radiology Education

Posted by  | A Day in the Life, Did You See This?

During his time at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Liwei Jiang, a graduating fourth year, found himself interacting with classmates and faculty members who were passionate about teaching. One such professor, Dr. Donna Magid, encouraged him to seek ways to make radiology more engaging and accessible to new medical students. "I didn't expect to(...)

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The Malthusian Dilemma: Biomedical Research in the Post-NIH Budget Doubling Era

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Shirley Tilghman, professor of molecular biology and former Princeton University president, delivered the 16th annual Daniel Nathans Lecture in Molecular Genetics about a dilemma unfolding in the scientific community. Although the talk was titled “The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: A Life in Biomedical Science,” Tilghman only used her first and last slides(...)

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Curbing the Tide of the Opioid Epidemic

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Every 19 minutes, someone dies from an opioid overdose in the United States. Yet the number of opioids prescribed annually is so high that each American adult could be medicated on a full bottle of pills around the clock for a whole month. Between 2013 and 2014, the risk of dying from opioid overdose increased(...)

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Red Meat: The Evolutionary Benefit and the Modern Dilemma

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Cooking meat provided a huge evolutionary benefit on the plains of Africa for Homo erectus 1.9 million years ago, allowing humans to become the dominant animal on this planet. And now, as billions of people in developing countries are lifted out of poverty, world meat consumption is rising dramatically. In the last half-century, consumption rose(...)

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Training Future Leaders in Primary Care

Posted by  | A Day in the Life, Did You See This?

Recently, as I’ve been spending more time in various clinical settings, I’ve noticed a striking lack of patients who can say they have a designated primary care doctor. Evidence has shown that primary care has an incredibly beneficial effect on population health. The work of generalists, such as family medicine physicians, pediatricians and internists, reduces(...)

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Once-Daily Combination Pills Offer More Than Convenience

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In November 2015, the FDA approved the HIV-1 medication Genvoya, a once-daily pill containing fixed doses of the HIV drugs elvitegravir, cobicistat, emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide. This is the latest once-daily medication to be produced to treat HIV, a disease that used to be managed primarily with many different pills taken multiple times a day.(...)

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