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Diversity at the Top of the Social Media Signaling Cascade

Diversity at the Top of the Social Media Signaling Cascade

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Caroline's essay received 3rd place in The Lasker Foundation Essay Contest. The Lasker Foundation’s Essay Contest engages young scientists and clinicians in a discussion about big questions in biology and medicine and the role of biomedical research in our society today.  The Contest aims to build skills in communicating important medical and scientific issues to(...)

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Finding the Missing Piece — the Limits of the Current Malaria Vaccine and How We Can Improve Future Vaccine Design

Finding the Missing Piece — the Limits of the Current Malaria Vaccine and How We Can Improve Future Vaccine Design

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With hundreds of millions of infections worldwide, malaria continues to be a global health threat and burden to vulnerable populations. For decades, researchers have dedicated work to stamping out this illness, which is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, and a vaccine was recently licensed for prevention of the disease. The vaccine, called RTS,S/AS01, has(...)

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Advice for Fellowship Applications – Part One

Advice for Fellowship Applications – Part One

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For graduate students, the first years of the Ph.D. are packed with an array of hurdles, and it is easy to end up feeling overwhelmed. Once you have passed your qualifying exams, chosen a thesis laboratory, finished the majority of your coursework and have a good general direction for your thesis project — roughly mid-second(...)

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A Novel Cancer Immunotherapy Unveiled: Y-Traps

A Novel Cancer Immunotherapy Unveiled: Y-Traps

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The human immune system is composed of a diverse array of cells, which collectively work to exterminate pathogenic entities in the body. Yet this system is able to recognize host, or self, tissues as “friendly” through a variety of so-called immune checkpoint signals. Many cancer types — including melanomas and breast cancers — exploit this(...)

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Advancing Glioblastoma Research: A Tale of Two Superheroes

Advancing Glioblastoma Research: A Tale of Two Superheroes

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Glioblastoma research is similar to superhero film plots. How, you may ask? If each superhero represents a different treatment drug, then we as researchers want to cause destruction of the cancer cells with the least number of superheroes possible. This is because we wouldn’t want patients to need to take a large cocktail of treatments(...)

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A New Blood Test Tries to Detect Cancer Sooner

A New Blood Test Tries to Detect Cancer Sooner

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A patient develops symptoms that cannot be explained. The doctor orders a myriad of tests to discern the cause. If cancer is suspected, the patient may go through a painful and sometimes invasive biopsy procedure to sample the tissue in question. But what if a simple blood draw could be used instead? This is the(...)

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Fresh or Frozen Embryos? Equal Live-Birth Rates Among Infertile Women

Fresh or Frozen Embryos? Equal Live-Birth Rates Among Infertile Women

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About 40 years ago (July 1978), Louise Joy Brown was born at Oldham General Hospital in England, weighing 5 pounds, 12 ounces. This birth may sound like any ordinary baby story, but the conception and delivery of Louise, the first human conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF), symbolized the possibility of having children for women(...)

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