Melanoma cells stained with PTRF (in red), RPA194 (in green) and nucleus stained in blue. RPA194 is the main subunit of the RNA polymerase I (POL 1) enzyme. Our lab discovered a first-in-class small molecule that inhibits POL 1 enzyme and causes the destruction of RPA194 protein. Here, we are investigating how these proteins are regulated by the new molecule in the cancer cells. This may allow us to understand the value of targeting RNA POL 1 in cancer, and support its development as a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer patients.

Jin-Yih’s work is featured on our new JHM.Fundamentals Instagram account, which showcases basic science images from students and faculty members at Johns Hopkins. Do you have cool images to share? Submit them here!

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The colorful world of cancer drug discovery. Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer, with nearly 9,000 deaths reported each year. That is why finding a treatment that can target these cells has become the focus of Nick Low’s postdoctoral work. Through his research, Low found ways to throw a wrench in melanoma’s cellular machinery. His lab discovered a small molecule that destroys the enzyme that allows these cancer cells to turn their DNA into proteins, called RNA Polymerase (shown in green). By investigating how these cellular processes are regulated by the new molecule in the cancer cells, Low hopes to understand the value of targeting RNA Polymerase in cancer and support its development as a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. Read more on this research at our Biomedical Odyssey Blog. Link in bio. #JHMFundamentals #Science #BasicScience #biology #InstaBiology #Research #BasicResearch #Medicine #fluorescence #scienceisbeatutiful #sciart #microphotography #cancer #melanoma #skincancer

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