Perspectives in Research

Out with the Old, in with Repaired Joints

Out with the Old, in with Repaired Joints

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

Osteoarthritis (OA) is not only the most common chronic condition of the joints, but also the most common type of arthritis, affecting approximately 27 million Americans.1 The prevalence of OA increases with age,2 and elderly patients experience swelling, pain and decreased mobility. Currently, there is no cure for this degenerative joint disease, and the only(...)

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A Revelation About DREADDs: A New Neuroscience Technique with Promise for Clinical Psychiatric Treatment

A Revelation About DREADDs: A New Neuroscience Technique with Promise for Clinical Psychiatric Treatment

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

In an essay I published last year for the Lasker Essay Contest (and republished in our blog), I described optogenetics and chemogenetics, two technologies recently developed for basic neuroscience research that have the potential to improve the way we treat psychiatric illness. The major drawback to drugs currently prescribed for diseases such as depression, PTSD,(...)

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Smarter Antimalarial Use: Altering Drug Duration to Improve Efficacy

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

Fighting malaria is getting harder, with rising rates of drug resistance and drug tolerance making it more difficult for doctors to effectively cure patients. Drug resistance is distinct from drug tolerance, in that a resistant microbe can survive even high doses of a particular drug, while tolerant microbes are able to replicate in the drug’s(...)

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Ecstasy and Agony: Accepting MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy as a Breakthrough PTSD Treatment

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

For the majority of the population, MDMA, or ecstasy, is simply an illegal drug, its use exclusive to underground dance clubs and its abuse the purview of the police. However, a small group of psychopharmacological researchers and advocates have been touting this compound as the next major frontline treatment for a variety of troubling psychological(...)

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Everyday Antibiotics May Reveal New Therapies to Treat Your Breast Cancer

Everyday Antibiotics May Reveal New Therapies to Treat Your Breast Cancer

Posted by  | A Day in the Life, Perspectives in Research

New therapies to treat metastatic breast cancer may lie within one of the most commonly used agents in health care across the world: antibiotics. Sonal Chaudhari, a second-year medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, recently spent her summer working under Richard Jones, director of the Bone Marrow Transplant Program, co-director of the(...)

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Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Epidemic. We typically associate this word with infectious disease outbreaks, often outside of the United States. But right here in the U.S., we are in the middle of a unique epidemic: an opioid epidemic. Opioids have long been used for the treatment of short-term pain, and more recently for long-term pain. But rising rates of(...)

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Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

We’re all familiar with the flu. Most consider it a pesky inconvenience or perhaps a good reason to miss work to stay home and watch Netflix. Among the list of viruses frequently mentioned in the news — Ebola, HIV, Zika — the “scare factor” associated with the flu is relatively low. But to an epidemiologist,(...)

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Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

It’s funny to note that many medical conditions are described using food analogies. For example, boxers are often diagnosed with “cauliflower ear”, a condition where the swollen ear resembles the folds of cauliflower; and birthmarks with a characteristic red color are referred to as “port wine stain.” Another example, cellulite, is often described as “orange(...)

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Mystery of Human Sex Pheromones Remains Unsolved

Mystery of Human Sex Pheromones Remains Unsolved

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Pheromones are chemicals secreted by animals that influence the behavior of recipient animals of the same species, often to attract mates. That some form of chemical communication occurs between animals was first recognized as far back as ancient Greece, when the Greeks noted that male dogs were attracted to secretions from female dogs in heat.(...)

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