In honor of Election Day in the United States, here is a collection of recent posts by Johns Hopkins School of Medicine students discussing the various intersections of science and politics.

STEMulate the Vote! Uniting science advocates before the 2020 election!

Join the Johns Hopkins Science Policy Group to help create high quality, reliable content about why it's important for STEM majors to vote and what science issues are on the ballot this fall.

Improving Healthcare Access Among the Newly Decarcerated

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Bernat Navarro-Serer published a new article in the Journal of Science Policy & Governance (JSPG) on improving healthcare access among formerly incarcerated individuals living with addiction.

A Medical Student’s Reflection on the Death of RBG

Sara Wallam, a second-year medical student, reflects on the loss of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and what her death may mean for the future of the country.

The Politics of a Pandemic

Josh Popp, a biomedical engineering Ph.D. student, discusses the impact of political partisanship on Americans' attitudes toward the COVID-19 pandemic.

Don’t Be Fooled: Science Is Political

Science is political — the faster the scientific community accepts that as its reality, says Ph.D. candidate Bernat Navarro-Serer, the greater impact science will have on society.

Global Threats to Public Health: Dr. Peter Hotez on Climate Change, Conflicts, Poverty and Antiscience

Climate change, global conflicts, poverty and antiscience: Peter Hotez gives us his take on these issues and their relationship to neglected tropical diseases and vaccines.

 

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