Perspectives in Research

Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

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Epidemic. We typically associate this word with infectious disease outbreaks, often outside of the United States. But right here in the U.S., we are in the middle of a unique epidemic: an opioid epidemic. Opioids have long been used for the treatment of short-term pain, and more recently for long-term pain. But rising rates of(...)

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Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

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We’re all familiar with the flu. Most consider it a pesky inconvenience or perhaps a good reason to miss work to stay home and watch Netflix. Among the list of viruses frequently mentioned in the news — Ebola, HIV, Zika — the “scare factor” associated with the flu is relatively low. But to an epidemiologist,(...)

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Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

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It’s funny to note that many medical conditions are described using food analogies. For example, boxers are often diagnosed with “cauliflower ear”, a condition where the swollen ear resembles the folds of cauliflower; and birthmarks with a characteristic red color are referred to as “port wine stain.” Another example, cellulite, is often described as “orange(...)

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Mystery of Human Sex Pheromones Remains Unsolved

Mystery of Human Sex Pheromones Remains Unsolved

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Pheromones are chemicals secreted by animals that influence the behavior of recipient animals of the same species, often to attract mates. That some form of chemical communication occurs between animals was first recognized as far back as ancient Greece, when the Greeks noted that male dogs were attracted to secretions from female dogs in heat.(...)

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Competition in an Age of Collaboration

Competition in an Age of Collaboration

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The competitive drive is a double-edged sword: Fighting for success or superiority sharpens our mental acuity and increases motivation, while concurrently inducing anxiety and decreasing inhibitions. Success in fast-paced. Intensive careers such as business, law, science and medicine require using this competitive spirit to drive higher performance and production. Yet this drive to succeed can(...)

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Hopkins Mood Disorders Symposium: Gaining Perspectives and Generating Conversations

Hopkins Mood Disorders Symposium: Gaining Perspectives and Generating Conversations

Posted by  | Events and Happenings, Perspectives in Research

A sizeable crowd of over two hundred attendees gathered in Turner Auditorium on April 18, 2017, to hear discussions on mood disorders at the 31st Annual Mood Disorders Research/Education Symposium, sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center. Mood disorders, which encompass major depression, anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder, as well as a spectrum of(...)

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Engaging Medical Students in Outpatient Clinics

Engaging Medical Students in Outpatient Clinics

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As a fourth-year medical student at Johns Hopkins, I have had the privilege of working with attending physicians in a number of outpatient clinics. My roles in the clinic have varied. In most clinics, I see the patient independently, take a history, and perform a physical exam. I then describe the course of the illness,(...)

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