Perspectives in Research

From Soup to Vents: Hypotheses for the Origin of Life

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

In the early 1950s, Stanley Miller and Harold Urey created one of the most well known soup recipes. This soup didn't have chicken and noodles, but instead was an amalgamation of ammonia, methane, and hydrogen gas cooked with bursts of electric shocks and high temperatures. After a week of brewing, what remained was a thick(...)

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A Renewed Appreciation for Olympic Athletes

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

In medical school, physicians-in-training spend countless hours learning about the human body. First, we are taught to understand the complexities of normal physiology and how such intricate systems can become unbalanced and deteriorate, leading to an endless and fascinating multitude of human diseases and illnesses. With this foundational knowledge, we set off to begin the(...)

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Platelet-Rich Plasma: An Emerging Therapy for Musculoskeletal Injuries

Posted by  | Did You See This?, Perspectives in Research

Athletes engaging in sports often experience injuries to the muscles, tendons and ligaments. Due to frequent use, the shoulder, elbow, knee and ankle-joints are more susceptible to musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries than other joints. Musculoskeletal injuries account for about 30 percent of annual visits to primary physicians in the United States. Traditional treatments have included(...)

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Podcasts: A New Approach to Learning

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

In 2013, the Serial podcast shook the airwaves as it chronicled a crime in Baltimore. Since then, many have been inspired to use podcasts as an easily accessible learning tool, which has created an excellent means for people to better understand otherwise intimidating subjects. There are many podcasts in science and medicine for those who(...)

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Solving the Scientific Reproducibility Crisis

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

In an ideal world, reproducibility is a cornerstone of scientific research. The scientific method should provide conclusions that are as close to the truth as possible. In reality, reproducibility of results is a constant worry in scientific research. According to a recent survey by Nature, scientific irreproducibility is at a crisis level. The inability to(...)

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Prostate Cancer Therapy Linked to Depression

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

A recent study by researchers from Harvard, MD Anderson and Weill Cornell, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed an association between a common treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer and clinical depression. These results are part of a broader conversation about how prostate cancer is treated and could impact the way that clinicians(...)

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Modern Neuroscience has the tools to treat psychiatric illness

Posted by  | Honor Roll, Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

The following submission is the first place winner of The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation 2016 essay contest. You can read the original posting here.  Modern medicine has worked miracles: we have cured infectious diseases with vaccines, replaced failing organs with transplants, converted many cancers from death sentences into treatable conditions. But one area has(...)

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