Reflections on Dermatology and Telemedicine in Brazil

Reflections on Dermatology and Telemedicine in Brazil

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Rapidly evolving telecommunication and information technologies have led to incredible changes in our lives — including how we manage our health. In particular, teledermatology, or the use of communication technology by dermatologists to support the diagnosis, consultation and treatment of patients, has become an important element of health care in the United States and around(...)

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Out with the Old, in with Repaired Joints

Out with the Old, in with Repaired Joints

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

Osteoarthritis (OA) is not only the most common chronic condition of the joints, but also the most common type of arthritis, affecting approximately 27 million Americans.1 The prevalence of OA increases with age,2 and elderly patients experience swelling, pain and decreased mobility. Currently, there is no cure for this degenerative joint disease, and the only(...)

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A Revelation About DREADDs: A New Neuroscience Technique with Promise for Clinical Psychiatric Treatment

A Revelation About DREADDs: A New Neuroscience Technique with Promise for Clinical Psychiatric Treatment

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

In an essay I published last year for the Lasker Essay Contest (and republished in our blog), I described optogenetics and chemogenetics, two technologies recently developed for basic neuroscience research that have the potential to improve the way we treat psychiatric illness. The major drawback to drugs currently prescribed for diseases such as depression, PTSD,(...)

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Smarter Antimalarial Use: Altering Drug Duration to Improve Efficacy

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

Fighting malaria is getting harder, with rising rates of drug resistance and drug tolerance making it more difficult for doctors to effectively cure patients. Drug resistance is distinct from drug tolerance, in that a resistant microbe can survive even high doses of a particular drug, while tolerant microbes are able to replicate in the drug’s(...)

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Genetic Double-Agents Are Making You Old

Genetic Double-Agents Are Making You Old

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

We’re getting old. Unprecedented advances in biomedical research and technology over the last century have increased the average human lifespan in the United States by over 50 percent.1 And with more people enrolling in Medicare than prenatal partner yoga, it is vital to understand and improve the health of the aging population. Unfortunately, getting older(...)

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Nearing the Finish: A Reflection on Medical School

Nearing the Finish: A Reflection on Medical School

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

The seasons I spent running high school cross country have long gone, and I'm far from a great long-distance runner now, but I remember three things our coach was always shouting at us. "You're only as fast as the slowest person!" While it seemed like every runner was on the trail by herself, it was always, ultimately, a(...)

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Ecstasy and Agony: Accepting MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy as a Breakthrough PTSD Treatment

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

For the majority of the population, MDMA, or ecstasy, is simply an illegal drug, its use exclusive to underground dance clubs and its abuse the purview of the police. However, a small group of psychopharmacological researchers and advocates have been touting this compound as the next major frontline treatment for a variety of troubling psychological(...)

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Ban the Box on College Applications

Ban the Box on College Applications

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

“From Prison Cell to Ph.D.” is a series following the journey of Dr. Stanley Andrisse, who was convicted of 2 felony drug charges and sentenced to 10 years in Missouri prison. He is now a postdoctoral scientist in pediatric endocrinology and trainee leader at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “This is a collect call from the Northeast Correctional Center,”(...)

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