So You Want to Attend an Academic Conference…

So You Want to Attend an Academic Conference…

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Academic conferences are an integral part of a graduate student’s training. They are not only a window into the life of a professor but also help you to connect with colleagues across the globe. Even better, you get to spend time outside of the lab with your lab mates while still learning new things about(...)

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Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Epidemic. We typically associate this word with infectious disease outbreaks, often outside of the United States. But right here in the U.S., we are in the middle of a unique epidemic: an opioid epidemic. Opioids have long been used for the treatment of short-term pain, and more recently for long-term pain. But rising rates of(...)

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The Hidden Joys of Medical School

The Hidden Joys of Medical School

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

I finished my first marathon last week, a personal mental marathon that took hundreds of hours to complete—my first year of medical school. Our last lecture on that final Friday afternoon was followed by a barrage of claps, applause, cheers, celebratory pictures for Facebook and Instagram photos, and a general sense of urgency to leave(...)

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First Approval of Cancer Immunotherapy Based on Genetic Marker

First Approval of Cancer Immunotherapy Based on Genetic Marker

Posted by  | Recently Published

Immunotherapy is rapidly becoming one of the cornerstones of treatment for several types of cancers, and pembrolizumab, a well-known humanized antibody against the checkpoint inhibitor programmed death 1 (PD-1), is again in the spotlight for new expanded use based on patient's genetic differences. In a first of its kind, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration(...)

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Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Posted by  | Recently Published

Is parabiosis the new fountain of youth? Parabiosis, meaning “living beside,” is a 150-year-old surgical technique that unites the blood vessels of two living animals. One of the earliest accounts of parabiosis comes from the mid-1800s when a French zoologist, Paul Bert, attached the circulatory systems of two animals and demonstrated that fluid injected into(...)

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Spreading Hope to Those Deemed Hopeless

Spreading Hope to Those Deemed Hopeless

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Still half-asleep, I woke up at 4 a.m. to hit the highway for a four-hour drive. I had retired from “moving weight” (selling drugs) to moving words—ones of experience and inspiration. I was headed back to prison. I had a conversation with my mom the night before about me going “back to prison.” After her initial(...)

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The Selfless Act of Mentorship

The Selfless Act of Mentorship

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

I recently lost a mentor of mine. Jeff Nye, vice president of neuroscience innovation and scientific partnership strategy at Johnson & Johnson Innovation, passed away in March, due to cancer. I’ve known Jeff since I was born, but it wasn’t until I was in college, seeking a career path, that he became my mentor. Jeff(...)

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Inside a Med Student’s Mind On a Patient Visit

Inside a Med Student’s Mind On a Patient Visit

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

(Disclaimers: Although much of the following comes from my medical education, it should not be generalized to all medical students. Certain details — name, identifiers, complaints — have been modified for privacy reasons.) 7:59 p.m. I am standing outside the patient’s room in the hospital. She has just been transferred from the emergency department (ED).(...)

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Stop and Smell the Pages

Stop and Smell the Pages

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

As a child, my mother would take my siblings and me to the local public library. I would check out so many books that the librarians would often ask if I was sure I could read them all. I met their challenge, however, to the point where I would sometimes get in trouble at school(...)

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Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

We’re all familiar with the flu. Most consider it a pesky inconvenience or perhaps a good reason to miss work to stay home and watch Netflix. Among the list of viruses frequently mentioned in the news — Ebola, HIV, Zika — the “scare factor” associated with the flu is relatively low. But to an epidemiologist,(...)

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