Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

It’s funny to note that many medical conditions are described using food analogies. For example, boxers are often diagnosed with “cauliflower ear”, a condition where the swollen ear resembles the folds of cauliflower; and birthmarks with a characteristic red color are referred to as “port wine stain.” Another example, cellulite, is often described as “orange(...)

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Mystery of Human Sex Pheromones Remains Unsolved

Mystery of Human Sex Pheromones Remains Unsolved

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Pheromones are chemicals secreted by animals that influence the behavior of recipient animals of the same species, often to attract mates. That some form of chemical communication occurs between animals was first recognized as far back as ancient Greece, when the Greeks noted that male dogs were attracted to secretions from female dogs in heat.(...)

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Competition in an Age of Collaboration

Competition in an Age of Collaboration

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

The competitive drive is a double-edged sword: Fighting for success or superiority sharpens our mental acuity and increases motivation, while concurrently inducing anxiety and decreasing inhibitions. Success in fast-paced. Intensive careers such as business, law, science and medicine require using this competitive spirit to drive higher performance and production. Yet this drive to succeed can(...)

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Hopkins Mood Disorders Symposium: Gaining Perspectives and Generating Conversations

Hopkins Mood Disorders Symposium: Gaining Perspectives and Generating Conversations

Posted by  | Events and Happenings, Perspectives in Research

A sizeable crowd of over two hundred attendees gathered in Turner Auditorium on April 18, 2017, to hear discussions on mood disorders at the 31st Annual Mood Disorders Research/Education Symposium, sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center. Mood disorders, which encompass major depression, anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder, as well as a spectrum of(...)

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A Brighter Image: Peeking Into the Macaque Brain

A Brighter Image: Peeking Into the Macaque Brain

Posted by  | Recently Published

Each Tuesday, I read the New York Times science section over a cup of coffee and a protein bar. Last week’s article, “Hunched over his microscope, he sketched the secrets of how the brain worked,” exhibits the father of neuroscience, Ramon y Cajal’s, 19th century drawings and elucidations of the neuronal interconnectivity that wires our(...)

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Practicing Mindfulness May Help Negate Long-Term Negative Effects of Trauma in Children

Practicing Mindfulness May Help Negate Long-Term Negative Effects of Trauma in Children

Posted by  | Recently Published

Children who experience traumatic experiences are known to have long-term negative health effects, including mental, behavioral and physical issues. Mindfulness interventions have proven successful in adults and those dealing with trauma to negate some of the effects of distress. It is suggested that mindfulness could be utilized in children with adverse childhood experiences to also(...)

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A Medical Student Finds Beauty in Studying

A Medical Student Finds Beauty in Studying

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

I am sitting in one of the most beautiful architectural marvels I have ever seen: the iconic Rose Main Reading Room of the New York Public Library. A thoughtless turn of the head while stretching my neck and I catch a glimpse of centuries of knowledge in their primordial form — first edition journals and(...)

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5 Tips for Preparing for your Ph.D. Candidacy Exam

5 Tips for Preparing for your Ph.D. Candidacy Exam

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

The oral exam. The candidacy exam. The comprehensive exam. There are many names for it, but all pre-doctoral graduate students come to fear it. At different universities, this pivotal exam happens at different points in your Ph.D. At Johns Hopkins, most students will take their candidacy exam after their main courses are finished, but before(...)

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