Why Do Students Pursue a Ph.D. in Neuroscience?

Why Do Students Pursue a Ph.D. in Neuroscience?

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

As a fourth-year neuroscience Ph.D. student, I appreciate the variety of topics that lie within the umbrella of the nervous system. Nowhere is this more evident than in the diverse backgrounds and passions of my fellow students. To provide a glimpse into the vibrant world of neuroscience research, and to provide insight to others considering(...)

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Re-thinking Language as a Scientific Tool

Re-thinking Language as a Scientific Tool

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Preclusion of efficacious scientific communication, nucleating from the cultivation of an elitist scientific culture, is a pervasive detriment to the impact of science. Wait, let me turn off scientist mode and start over. Ahem. Occam’s razor — often interpreted as: when there are various solutions to a problem, choose the simplest one — represents a(...)

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Is Cough Syrup an Antidepressant?

Is Cough Syrup an Antidepressant?

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Everything from shrooms and weed to molly and ketamine — once known mainly as party drugs — is finding a place in clinical trials for depression and other mental health conditions. Precisely how they work on the brain, however, strays wildly from prescription antidepressants. In doing so, these drugs are challenging traditional ideas of how(...)

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Movie Review of “End Game”

Movie Review of “End Game”

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Guest post by medical student Barry Bryant. The original article can be found on Closler.org. “End Game” is an Oscar-nominated short documentary directed by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman. The film takes place at the University of California at San Francisco and incorporates the Zen Hospice Project. The overarching theme of the film is working(...)

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19th-Century Technology, 21st-Century Users

19th-Century Technology, 21st-Century Users

Posted by  | A Day in the Life, Perspectives in Research

In February, the Johns Hopkins History of Medicine Survey had the opportunity to experiment with three stethoscopes: a replica of René Laennec’s 1816 stethoscope, a Russian cavalry surgeon’s 1915 stethoscope and a modern stethoscope bought a few years ago. Per M.D./Ph.D. student Maya Koretsky’s instructions, I sat on the office desk with my back turned(...)

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Every Ph.D. Journey Is Different, and That’s OK

Every Ph.D. Journey Is Different, and That’s OK

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

As a second-year student in the pathobiology graduate program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, I joined a thesis lab this past August. During our first year, we do three research rotations in different labs to get more experience doing research at the graduate student level, in addition to getting a feel for(...)

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Underrepresented minority biomedical researchers: numbers, challenges and initiatives for change

Underrepresented minority biomedical researchers: numbers, challenges and initiatives for change

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

In 2012, the Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Diversity (ACDWGD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) produced its first report. The committee stated plainly that diversity increases core scientific principles — creativity, innovation and rigor — and that the NIH had a responsibility as a publicly funded body to maintain the(...)

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