Hidden Talent at Hopkins

Hidden Talent at Hopkins

Posted by  | Honor Roll

Stepping into the Anne and Mike Armstrong Medical Education Building (AMEB), you can always count on Aisha to brighten your day. Born and raised in Baltimore, Aisha has worked at Johns Hopkins since 2009, and recently changed positions from security first class officer to interim administrative assistant. Everybody knows and loves Aisha, who greets each(...)

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The Beginning and End of an Era

The Beginning and End of an Era

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Medical school curriculum has traditionally been split into two halves: preclinical and clinical years. Preclinical years generally include the first two years of medical school, when topics including anatomy, biochemistry and organ system-based physiology, pharmacology and pathology are taught in lecture halls. At most schools, clinical years encompass the last two years of medical school,(...)

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A New Blood Test Tries to Detect Cancer Sooner

A New Blood Test Tries to Detect Cancer Sooner

Posted by  | Recently Published

A patient develops symptoms that cannot be explained. The doctor orders a myriad of tests to discern the cause. If cancer is suspected, the patient may go through a painful and sometimes invasive biopsy procedure to sample the tissue in question. But what if a simple blood draw could be used instead? This is the(...)

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Fresh or Frozen Embryos? Equal Live-Birth Rates Among Infertile Women

Fresh or Frozen Embryos? Equal Live-Birth Rates Among Infertile Women

Posted by  | Did You See This?, Recently Published

About 40 years ago (July 1978), Louise Joy Brown was born at Oldham General Hospital in England, weighing 5 pounds, 12 ounces. This birth may sound like any ordinary baby story, but the conception and delivery of Louise, the first human conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF), symbolized the possibility of having children for women(...)

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Do You Want to Write For Us?

Do You Want to Write For Us?

Posted by  | Did You See This?

Do you blog? Journal? Write in your spare time? Are you interested in pursuing communications at any level in parallel with your professional training? We need you! Biomedical Odyssey: Adventures from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is a newsfeed dedicated to showcasing the accomplishments of the students, postdocs, residents and fellows here at the Johns(...)

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Mental Health on the Reservation: Native American Teens and Toxic Stress

Mental Health on the Reservation: Native American Teens and Toxic Stress

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Toxic stress is everywhere. As a pediatrician in Baltimore City, I acknowledge the elephant in the exam room at nearly every appointment. Abuse. Neglect. Domestic violence. Toxic stress is a term used to describe the repeated experience of adverse childhood events without positive interpersonal relationships to buffer the ongoing trauma. As a result, children in(...)

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Last Year’s Resolutions — A Brief Summary of Some of 2017’s Greatest Scientific Advances and Discoveries

Last Year’s Resolutions — A Brief Summary of Some of 2017’s Greatest Scientific Advances and Discoveries

Posted by  | Did You See This?

The onset of each new year is frequently marred by overly ambitious and quickly neglected resolutions — an onslaught of new gym memberships, Jenny Craig enrollments, and Kindle purchases that will likely remain unread for years. New Year’s resolutions aside, the beginning of the year is a timely opportunity to reflect on how far we’ve come.(...)

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Using Epigenetics to Fight Tumors

Using Epigenetics to Fight Tumors

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

While the word cancer treatment may identify everything from chemotherapy to radiation, there is significant variance between the type of cancer and its responsiveness to even the most promising therapies. That has been precisely the case for the α-PD-1 immunotherapy treatment. While it has shown remarkable efficacy in patients diagnosed with lung cancer, other types(...)

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