Research

Hitting a Wall

Hitting a Wall

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

More often than not, people come to a point in their academic careers where they hit a wall; some of us just do it more literally than others. What started out as a strange niche sport for people living on the fringe of society has quickly become a fast-growing sport in America. The first indoor(...)

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Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Posted by  | Recently Published

Is parabiosis the new fountain of youth? Parabiosis, meaning “living beside,” is a 150-year-old surgical technique that unites the blood vessels of two living animals. One of the earliest accounts of parabiosis comes from the mid-1800s when a French zoologist, Paul Bert, attached the circulatory systems of two animals and demonstrated that fluid injected into(...)

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Solving the Scientific Reproducibility Crisis

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

In an ideal world, reproducibility is a cornerstone of scientific research. The scientific method should provide conclusions that are as close to the truth as possible. In reality, reproducibility of results is a constant worry in scientific research. According to a recent survey by Nature, scientific irreproducibility is at a crisis level. The inability to(...)

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Becoming a Science Storyteller: Tips on Communication

Posted by  | Events and Happenings

“Nobody has to read this crap!” Ed Yong began his talk at a recent American Society of Human Genetics symposium, The Art and Science of Science Communication, with a bombshell. As scientists, we hold information in the highest regard, especially information we discovered while toiling away in the lab. But Yong insists that no one has(...)

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Highlights from the 2015 American Society of Human Genetics Conference

Posted by  | Events and Happenings

As the American Society of Human Genetics concluded its 65th annual meeting in Baltimore, the air around the Johns Hopkins McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine still seems to buzz with the excitement of it all. Among the plethora of innovative research and technologies presented, the society devoted some focus to those entities whose existence is(...)

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Hobbies Offer Scientists a Much-Needed Break from the Lab

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Last year — on a whim, and to temporarily escape the stresses of neuroscience research — I began to take improvisational comedy classes with the Baltimore Improv Group (BIG). Once a week, I’d leave the world of pipette tips, blinking displays and squirming mice and instead be transported to whatever reality my scene partners and(...)

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Johns Hopkins’ Dr. Donald Coffey Honored for Cancer Research, Mentoring

Posted by  | Honor Roll

At the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting this past April,  Donald Coffey, Ph.D., was honored with the ninth annual Margaret Foti Award for Leadership and Extraordinary Achievements in Cancer Research. The award recognizes individuals whose leadership and achievements have demonstrated a major impact in the cancer research. The contributions Dr. Coffey has(...)

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