Neuroscience

Discussing the NIH Mandate to Study Sex as a Biological Variable in Basic Biomedical Research

Discussing the NIH Mandate to Study Sex as a Biological Variable in Basic Biomedical Research

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

In one of my courses in the neuroscience Ph.D. program at Johns Hopkins, we recently discussed the 2016 National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandate requiring consideration of sex as a biological variable in grant applications to NIH agencies. Citing the success of the initiative to include both men and women in human clinical trials, the(...)

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A New Animal Model for Bad Decisions

A New Animal Model for Bad Decisions

Posted by  | Recently Published

Humans are constantly making decisions about how to spend time, yet we are pretty terrible at doing so effectively. We sit through boring movies, stay in line at a crowded restaurant and continue to pursue low-return projects, because we simply cannot bear to see the time we have already invested in these activities go to(...)

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That’s Not Fair! — The Neuroscience of Injustice

That’s Not Fair! — The Neuroscience of Injustice

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

As a kid you probably found some decisions by your parents utterly unjust. Perhaps you proclaimed, “That’s not fair!” when you were forced to eat spinach, or if your sibling got something you didn’t. As adults, we still experience intense sensations of injustice, sometimes in response to more serious issues such as human rights, health(...)

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Choosing to Be Irrational: How Neuroscience Incorporated Economics, and Vice Versa

Choosing to Be Irrational: How Neuroscience Incorporated Economics, and Vice Versa

Posted by  | Did You See This?

The Department of Neuroeconomics and Neuromarketing sounds like a title chiseled on the wall of a corporate division in a dystopian future; the highlight of a consumerism episode of Black Mirror. But Dino Levy, a researcher in this seemingly dystopian department at Tel Aviv University, was quick to readjust our preconceived notions of what his lab studies(...)

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Why Winners Keep Winning

Why Winners Keep Winning

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

You are on a roll. In the morning, you delivered a compelling business proposal. You were the center of attention at lunch and your colleagues loved your witty remarks. In the afternoon meeting, you stood your ground and brilliantly defended your case with irrefutable arguments. When it’s your day, you feel invincible. What gives you(...)

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Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Posted by  | Recently Published

Is parabiosis the new fountain of youth? Parabiosis, meaning “living beside,” is a 150-year-old surgical technique that unites the blood vessels of two living animals. One of the earliest accounts of parabiosis comes from the mid-1800s when a French zoologist, Paul Bert, attached the circulatory systems of two animals and demonstrated that fluid injected into(...)

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Who Has Time to Sleep?

Who Has Time to Sleep?

Posted by  | A Day in the Life, Perspectives in Research

At the proverbial watercooler in teaching hospitals across the world, one hears remarkably similar refrains: “This patient is back again,” “I have no idea why my experiment failed this time” and, most universally, “I’ve only slept three hours in the past two days!” Medical trainees often view sleep deprivation as a badge of honor, one(...)

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