Kyla Britson

About Kyla Britson

Kyla Britson is a Ph.D. candidate in cellular and molecular medicine. She has been playing violin since she was 10. She was in her college’s campus orchestra, and since moving to Baltimore she has been part of the Hunt Valley Symphony. She says playing the violin has always been her artistic break from science.

Posts by Kyla Britson:

Who Let the Dogs Out?

Who Let the Dogs Out?

I occasionally find myself walking through the dark underbelly of the Johns Hopkins medical campus along “designated laboratory transport” routes. These concrete tunnels allow researchers to transport equipment or mice from animal facilities to laboratories without passing through patient areas. I always feel a pang of sadness when I see stacks of dog food in(...)

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Lights, Camera, Science!

Lights, Camera, Science!

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s…the Science & Entertainment Exchange? Ann Merchant swooped into the February Telling Stories About Science seminar with an origin story in hand and prepared to engage. The goal of this seminar program is to invite professionals with a wide variety of backgrounds and expertise to give monthly seminars on(...)

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Developing a Laboratory Model for Inclusion Body Myositis

Developing a Laboratory Model for Inclusion Body Myositis

If you were diagnosed with a disease, there are two questions you would immediately want answered: 1. How can we treat it? 2. What caused the disease? Those two questions are the foundation of my Ph.D. thesis. I study a muscle disease called inclusion body myositis (IBM), which is sometimes referred to as the “Alzheimer’s(...)

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Science on the Streets

Science on the Streets

“You’ve heard about some of these pet projects, they really don’t make a whole lot of sense, and sometimes these dollars go to projects that have little or nothing to do with the public good. Things like fruit fly research in Paris, France. I kid you not.”   -Sarah Palin As a graduate student in a lab(...)

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Hitting a Wall

Hitting a Wall

More often than not, people come to a point in their academic careers where they hit a wall; some of us just do it more literally than others. What started out as a strange niche sport for people living on the fringe of society has quickly become a fast-growing sport in America. The first indoor(...)

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