cancer research

The Colorful World of Cancer Drug Discovery

The Colorful World of Cancer Drug Discovery

Posted by  | Did You See This?

Melanoma cells stained with PTRF (in red), RPA194 (in green) and nucleus stained in blue. RPA194 is the main subunit of the RNA polymerase I (POL 1) enzyme. Our lab discovered a first-in-class small molecule that inhibits POL 1 enzyme and causes the destruction of RPA194 protein. Here, we are investigating how these proteins are(...)

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Using Epigenetics to Fight Tumors

Using Epigenetics to Fight Tumors

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research, Recently Published

While the word cancer treatment may identify everything from chemotherapy to radiation, there is significant variance between the type of cancer and its responsiveness to even the most promising therapies. That has been precisely the case for the α-PD-1 immunotherapy treatment. While it has shown remarkable efficacy in patients diagnosed with lung cancer, other types(...)

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When Cancer Hits Home: A Researcher’s Call to Action

When Cancer Hits Home: A Researcher’s Call to Action

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

My fifth grade world — a typical one concerned with classes, friends, recess, lunch menus and dreading middle school — forever changed one day, when I sat on the ABC-patterned carpet in my classroom and watched my favorite teacher hide tears from the class. I first met her in third grade. She was always peppy(...)

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Understanding Disparities in Clinical Trial Enrollment

Understanding Disparities in Clinical Trial Enrollment

Posted by  | Recently Published

When scientists and clinicians hear the words “clinical trial”, we may think of hope, discovery, and a new chance at life. But for racial and ethnic minorities, these words may not have the same positive connotation but may rather be associated with inaccessibility, fear, and exclusion. The potential benefits for patients who participate in clinical(...)

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Nobel Prize Winning Research May Lead to New Therapies for Cancer, Alzheimer’s

Nobel Prize Winning Research May Lead to New Therapies for Cancer, Alzheimer’s

Posted by  | Did You See This?, Perspectives in Research

Yoshinori Ohsumi of the University of Tokyo was recently awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work in mechanisms for autophagy. What is autophagy? From the Greek roots “auto,“ or self, and “phagia,” or eating, the word literally means self-eating. In cell biology, autophagy describes the way that cells recycle unneeded(...)

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Recent NIH Funding and Moonshot Initiatives: Are they They Helping or Hindering?

Posted by  | Did You See This?

During the final month of 2015, Congress passed a $1.1 trillion federal spending bill that would keep the government fiscally solvent into September 2016. Along with large tax breaks, new cyber security programs and ending a ban on oil exports, new appropriations were made for the world’s largest research agency, the National Institutes of Health (NIH).(...)

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