in the lab

Tips on How to Choose the Right Laboratory

Tips on How to Choose the Right Laboratory

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

For a graduate student or postdoc, choosing the right laboratory can be a daunting prospect. There are many factors that one must consider, but deciding which to prioritize is often challenging. Individual learning styles, interests and career goals vary vastly, so an environment perfectly suited to one person may be one where another flounders. That(...)

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The Colorful World of Cancer Drug Discovery

The Colorful World of Cancer Drug Discovery

Posted by  | Did You See This?

Melanoma cells stained with PTRF (in red), RPA194 (in green) and nucleus stained in blue. RPA194 is the main subunit of the RNA polymerase I (POL 1) enzyme. Our lab discovered a first-in-class small molecule that inhibits POL 1 enzyme and causes the destruction of RPA194 protein. Here, we are investigating how these proteins are(...)

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The Universal Lab Language

The Universal Lab Language

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

On the floor where I work in the preclinical teaching building at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, there are a variety of postdoctoral fellows, students, technicians and faculty from all over the world. We have postdoctoral fellows from China, Portugal and Israel, and graduate students from Germany, Canada and Taiwan. You can always(...)

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The Science of Snoring

The Science of Snoring

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

There are few disciplines in science and medicine as broadly important, or as inherently relatable, as the study of sleep. During the annual Johns Hopkins Sleep and Circadian Research Day, a disparate group of clinicians, epidemiologists, geneticists and basic researchers gather to share posters and present new findings at the vanguard of sleep research on(...)

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Titan Titin: When Mutations in the Largest Known Protein Affect the Heart

Titan Titin: When Mutations in the Largest Known Protein Affect the Heart

Posted by  | Events and Happenings

“We know from our clinical experience in the practice of medicine that in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, the individual and his background of heredity are just as important, if not more so, as the disease itself.” — Paul Dudley White (1886–1973), Chief Consultant, National Heart Institute For the second installment of the Heart, Lung and(...)

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Why Winners Keep Winning

Why Winners Keep Winning

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

You are on a roll. In the morning, you delivered a compelling business proposal. You were the center of attention at lunch and your colleagues loved your witty remarks. In the afternoon meeting, you stood your ground and brilliantly defended your case with irrefutable arguments. When it’s your day, you feel invincible. What gives you(...)

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Developing a Laboratory Model for Inclusion Body Myositis

Developing a Laboratory Model for Inclusion Body Myositis

Posted by  | Did You See This?

If you were diagnosed with a disease, there are two questions you would immediately want answered: 1. How can we treat it? 2. What caused the disease? Those two questions are the foundation of my Ph.D. thesis. I study a muscle disease called inclusion body myositis (IBM), which is sometimes referred to as the “Alzheimer’s(...)

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Does My Sense of Smell Make Me Look Fat?

Does My Sense of Smell Make Me Look Fat?

Posted by  | Recently Published

Long before we see or taste food, what strikes us most is its aroma wafting through the air. While eating, what we perceive as taste is not only due to the sensation on our taste buds, but is also mediated by our sense of smell. Although we can detect only five primary tastes, we are(...)

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