A Day in the Life

The Problem of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit

The Problem of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

In cardiac surgery, most patients come out of the operating room still heavily sedated and intubated — a tube down their windpipe helps them breathe, one is in their bladder so they don’t need to urinate and multiple others protrude from their chest, draining blood-tinged fluid. Some patients exit surgery actively “paced,” with several wires(...)

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Compassion in Eight Stitches

Compassion in Eight Stitches

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

The first time, you don’t realize how warm his body will be. On some level, you knew the patient’s temperature would be in the range of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit; his skin, just a few degrees below that. But somehow that information never registered with your fingertips. As you feel the tissue around his wound, palpating(...)

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The Anatomy of Being Human

The Anatomy of Being Human

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

It’s 6 a.m., and my alarm goes off. Groggily, I continue to press snooze for the next hour, until I realize I won’t be able to enjoy a breakfast that’s not a granola bar if I sleep any longer. It’s been six weeks since I started at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as(...)

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The Nuances of Health Insurance

The Nuances of Health Insurance

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Recently, I needed a minor surgery and had questions about my insurance coverage. I called my insurance company with the medical codes associated with the procedure and was informed that I did not need authorization for the surgery. Given my exposure to such situations as a medical professional, I knew to push beyond that question.(...)

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Life After Residency: Advice for the Fellowship Interview

Life After Residency: Advice for the Fellowship Interview

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Congratulations. After four years of college, four years of medical school, and three or more years of residency, you’ve decided to pursue extra specialized training, to get you a step closer to your life’s dream. Whatever subspecialty you decide on, it helps to approach the interview process fully informed. Fellowships tend to be even more(...)

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Who Cares for Resident Caretakers?

Posted by  | A Day in the Life, Recently Published

"Can you check my blood pressure?" This is a common request I get from my co-residents. Even I have taken advantage of the vacant blood pressure cuffs in our clinic to occasionally check my own numbers. Though it seems like medical trainees are constantly surrounded by health care, studies have actually shown that we are,(...)

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An Unexpected Death

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When I first decided I wanted to go to medical school, I never thought about the fact that I would see some of my patients die. The attraction of medicine is that a physician has the opportunity to help people live long, healthy lives. Unfortunately, death is a reality of life, and medicine cannot always(...)

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4 Things to Ask before Joining a Rotation Lab

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As the new school year approaches, incoming graduate students will face their first big challenge: choosing their first rotation lab. For graduate students, the lab they join to perform their thesis research will be chosen from the different labs they rotate through in their first year, making these preliminary rotations massively important. Many programs in(...)

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