Perspectives in Research

Everyday Antibiotics May Reveal New Therapies to Treat Your Breast Cancer

Everyday Antibiotics May Reveal New Therapies to Treat Your Breast Cancer

Posted by  | A Day in the Life, Perspectives in Research

New therapies to treat metastatic breast cancer may lie within one of the most commonly used agents in health care across the world: antibiotics. Sonal Chaudhari, a second-year medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, recently spent her summer working under Richard Jones, director of the Bone Marrow Transplant Program, co-director of the(...)

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Do You Want to Write for Us?

Do You Want to Write for Us?

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Do you blog? Journal? Write in your spare time? Are you interested in pursuing communications at any level in parallel with your professional training? We need you! Biomedical Odyssey: Adventures from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is a newsfeed dedicated to showcasing the accomplishments of the students, postdocs, residents and fellows here at the Johns(...)

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Would You Eat Lab-Made Meat?

Would You Eat Lab-Made Meat?

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

As a researcher in a muscle biology and regeneration lab, it’s disturbing to picture myself eating the tiny pieces of muscle I grow in petri dishes. However, the idea of growing muscle (meat) from avian (chicken) or bovine (cow) stem cells in the laboratory for human consumption is a reality today. Some people consider it(...)

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Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

Opioids: A Different Kind of Epidemic

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Epidemic. We typically associate this word with infectious disease outbreaks, often outside of the United States. But right here in the U.S., we are in the middle of a unique epidemic: an opioid epidemic. Opioids have long been used for the treatment of short-term pain, and more recently for long-term pain. But rising rates of(...)

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First Approval of Cancer Immunotherapy Based on Genetic Marker

First Approval of Cancer Immunotherapy Based on Genetic Marker

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Immunotherapy is rapidly becoming one of the cornerstones of treatment for several types of cancers, and pembrolizumab, a well-known humanized antibody against the checkpoint inhibitor programmed death 1 (PD-1), is again in the spotlight for new expanded use based on patient's genetic differences. In a first of its kind, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration(...)

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Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Human Cord Blood Improves Memory in Old Mice – Surge of Interest in the “Fountain of Youth”

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

Is parabiosis the new fountain of youth? Parabiosis, meaning “living beside,” is a 150-year-old surgical technique that unites the blood vessels of two living animals. One of the earliest accounts of parabiosis comes from the mid-1800s when a French zoologist, Paul Bert, attached the circulatory systems of two animals and demonstrated that fluid injected into(...)

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Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

Predicting the Path of the Next Flu Pandemic

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

We’re all familiar with the flu. Most consider it a pesky inconvenience or perhaps a good reason to miss work to stay home and watch Netflix. Among the list of viruses frequently mentioned in the news — Ebola, HIV, Zika — the “scare factor” associated with the flu is relatively low. But to an epidemiologist,(...)

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Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

Cellulite: Who, Why, and What Can Be Done

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

It’s funny to note that many medical conditions are described using food analogies. For example, boxers are often diagnosed with “cauliflower ear”, a condition where the swollen ear resembles the folds of cauliflower; and birthmarks with a characteristic red color are referred to as “port wine stain.” Another example, cellulite, is often described as “orange(...)

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