Highlights from the 2015 American Society of Human Genetics Conference

Posted by  | Events and Happenings

As the American Society of Human Genetics concluded its 65th annual meeting in Baltimore, the air around the Johns Hopkins McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine still seems to buzz with the excitement of it all. Among the plethora of innovative research and technologies presented, the society devoted some focus to those entities whose existence is(...)

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Fighting Obesity: A National Health Issue

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

It is no secret that weight loss is a major driver in American culture. In 2013, the U.S. weight loss market recorded a total market value of $60.5 billion1. And while there is certainly an aesthetic push behind weight loss culture, achieving a healthy weight is also incredibly important in terms of personal health. Almost(...)

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Biomedical Illustrators: Masters of Art and Science

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

The halls of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine (AAM) serve both as a testament to the importance of medical illustration and an homage to the program’s founder, Max Brödel. In addition to being a creator and cultivator of the program, he was also the progenitor of modern medical illustration and pioneered the use(...)

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Johns Hopkins Scientists Uncover Link Between Inflammation and Autoimmune Disorders

Posted by  | Recently Published

The human innate immune system is one of our body’s broadest defense mechanisms against infection. One familiar innate immune response we’ve all experienced is inflammation, which is a complex biological process that relies on signaling between cells stimulated by invading pathogens. A detailed mechanism of the inflammatory response has been missing until recently, when a(...)

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The Important Role of Caregivers in Health Care

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Though the individuals in this story are fictional, the stories presented reflect my real-life experiences with patients and their caregivers.  Upon entering my patient’s room, I introduced myself and apologized for running late. I sat across from Carry, my patient’s granddaughter. The clinic was running as usual that day. In one word: overbooked. I had(...)

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Encouraging Young Women in STEM Careers

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

“It really smells.” “Can we take apart the legs?” I was asked these questions by the girls with dissected frogs in front of them. I’ve been helping through a program aimed at engaging girls in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). With colleagues at the Girls Scouts of Central Maryland, I’ve helped girls dissect frogs,(...)

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Lessons Learned in Graduate School: Be Skeptical

Posted by  | A Day in the Life

Part 1 in a series of posts on “Lessons Learned in Graduate School.” Two hours. Four hours. Overnight, if I have the time. I must have asked half a dozen people, and I didn’t get the same answer twice. The question had been: How long do you incubate pelleted virus in fresh media before resuspending(...)

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The Benefits of Delayed Cord Clamping May Benefit Full-Term Infants, Study Shows

Posted by  | Perspectives in Research

As humans, we are inclined to make everything we do faster. Nowhere is that more apparent than in the delivery of medical treatments. But recent research may support delaying a medical intervention in order to benefit the patient. The medical intervention in question is a process known as cord clamping. “Cutting the cord” typically refers(...)

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